The long road of natural movement that is shorter after all.

Published on: Sep 18 2017 by Pieter Derycke

Going to the gym and doing some ‘standard’ strength and conditioning stuff on the machines, following a personal training schedule, seems like the most efficient way to let your muscles work, your heart pump and your lungs ventilate. It not only appears to be most efficient, it is especially designed to be so, and thus probably is the most efficient at it (or at least very efficient).

Natural movement appears to take a different route, a more meandering way to get the heart, lungs and muscles working. And in these hectic times, efficiency, time management, and results are what counts. People want to bio-hack their way to the benefits of whatever they’re doing…

But, I suggest, the long and meandering route could at least be very interesting too. Natural movement not only takes you to places where you can benefit from exercise for the heart, lungs and muscles, it also takes you to the advantages of being in nature (the so called biophilic effects) and being surrounded by a group of people (tribe), of having fun, of complex movements in complex environments, of creating real life practical skills and strength, of a well coordinated and organised body, of playing, of exposure to the elements, of personal challenges, adventure even, of cognitive and emotional wellness, of a boosted immune system, …

If you would have to achieve all these goals with different strategies, using different bio-hacking methods, I think a day would be too short. Another important thing to notice here, is that the whole can be more than the sum of its parts! And although it is surely possible to have distinct goals, natural movement fosters a more process-oriented approach. When the road brought you to your goal, the reward is more road to travel. A road that is challenging at some times, relaxed at other, but always beautiful, pleasing and engaging.

 

So even in this hectic era of time management and results-that-matter, the long way can actually be the short way after all.

 

(I know that my story here is a bit of an exaggeration and a false dichotomy…)

 

Cheers,

 

Pieter

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